Garden Fantasy for Spring 2010

I took advantage of a beautiful day to spend time outdoors in the winter garden with pruners in hand.  With the soil bare and the leaves gone I was checking where the new plants will go come spring and the layout of this year’s vegetable garden.   I cruised the yard with my pencil and graph paper – such a nerd – but sketching it helps me visualize my plans.  My kitchen island is strewn with seed catalogs, and lists of seeds I want – far too many to afford or even have room to plant!  It will be cold and wet again, winter is far from over, but I’ll have this brief balmy hiatus to remember.


By the last weekend in January I’ll have made my final decision about the seed order.  Some of the seed companies offer $25 coupons (!) so a $50 order only costs $25!  Way cool!  This year, along with all the vegetables, I also plan on planting a dwarf Stanley Prune plum and a dwarf Damson plum.  As with all fruit trees one has to have faith in the future – they take three year’s to produce but us gardeners are nothing if not optimistic.  Berries come faster but I have yet to develop a place to plant them.


2 Comments

  1. Leni –

    What Camille said. I'm the hippie gardener you met in Houston a couple of weeks ago. Actually, I was so impressed by the Monticello side of your card that I didn't see the reverse until later. We must talk about that culinary historian thing soon. For now, here's a crowd pleaser: take a mess of whole collard green leaves. Holding them by the stem, dip individual leaves in boiling water for a few seconds. Trim off stems, put a couple of table spoons of a nice spicy Louis'an or Southeast Texas boudin (casing removed, of course) in the middle of each leaf. Wrap up leaf like an egg roll or a burrito. Cook in a crock pot until the company comes over. Best served with Abita, Lone Star, or St. Arnolds. We be callin' dat a Cajun dolmaide. (Sorry about the spelling, it's all Greek to me.)

    Jim

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